Copyright and Advertising on line (2 Demonstrations 0105, 0111)


14:50 - 15:50 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room 1


105 A presentation, demonstration and discussion on the introduction of online advertising to selected University applications as a potential source of revenue
Ian Heath, Alex Norris


111 "Copyright's not a problem. I deliberately chose an obscure journal to take it from..."
Julian Tenney, Patrick Lockley


105 A presentation, demonstration and discussion on the introduction of online advertising to selected University applications as a potential source of revenue
Ian Heath, Alex Norris
The advertising market in the UK was worth £18.6 Billion in 2008 (Anon, 2010). Online advertising overtook television in 2009 (Sweney, 2009) and is now second only to press advertising in terms of value. Advertising to students in the UK is well established with many companies offering products and services to reach the student audience – goody bags, flyers, posters and direct promotions are all on offer. The key driver for the student segment is their current and future value. Students are tomorrow’s leaders and high earners, so creating positive messages for brands remains a key objective for business leaders from a range of industries, from mobile telecommunications, to retail and banking.In order to proceed successfully, one needs to introduce advertising on to key applications within the University network. It is best to focus on ‘landing’ and navigation pages that do not distract from the learning experience, but do have a high number of visitors. Advertising revenue is generated directly from the number of people viewing a page, with a fee paid for every thousand ‘impressions’ recorded. Initially, campaigns will command a low ‘network’ fee, but if the sector cooperated in a shared initiative, larger fees will be paid to reach this unique audience. A cost per thousand of 50p will rise to £5.00 and beyond if universities drive students to online services, and a substantial part of the sector takes part in a single initiative. Such a collective effort has a real prospect of making online advertising the channel to students in the UK, with annual revenues of five or six figures possible for each university. A reasonable and socially responsible advertising model requires some essential characteristics; a Code of Conduct that governs the overall approach and sets clear boundaries on what is acceptable content within the Higher Education sector; technology flexible enough to deliver this; robust processes that will ensure adherence with the Code of Conduct and be reactive enough to remove advertising that causes an adverse reaction. Consultation with Student Union representatives will of course be essential in any initiative. A combination of formal presentation and on-screen demonstration will hopefully lead to a lively debate for participants.


111 "Copyright's not a problem. I deliberately chose an obscure journal to take it from..."
Julian Tenney, Patrick Lockley
A new generation of tools are changing the e-learning landscape and empowering non-technical people to create high quality content as never before, and many of the problems associated with the authoring of content have been very much reduced. However, for many, the production of high quality media remains a challenge and mastery of the necessary tools with which to produce good quality graphics, sound and video remains out of reach. Consequently text tends to be over-used and the full benefits of multimedia resources are not always being realised without recourse to various media specialists. Copyright presents a serious problem for institutions as staff re-use resources from the internet, and understanding of the legal implications amongst staff remains variable. Good collections of good quality content appropriately licensed for reuse do exist, and increasingly those collections provide an Application Programming Interface (API) to allow the collection to be searched and items and associated meta data to be retrieved. Flickr is a good example of a sizable collection of visual resources that can be reused in learning materials. This demonstration will show how current work at the University of Nottingham is developing a search engine using the Flickr API to search for images licensed for reuse, and to retrieve the information necessary for attribution. The search functionality can be used standalone, making it simple to include properly attributed resources in new learning materials, and is also being integrated with our authoring software Xerte Online Toolkits, providing an effective workflow for content developers looking to reuse visual resources in their projects.