Deep Learning Design (Symposium 0276)


17:15 - 18:15 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room B62


276 Deep Learning Design (DLD):
addressing profound shifts in the learning-teaching landscape
Andrew Ravenscroft, Tom Boyle, John Cook


276 Deep Learning Design (DLD):
addressing profound shifts in the learning-teaching landscape
Andrew Ravenscroft, Tom Boyle, John Cook
Changes in underpinning learning technologies is occurring at a pace that we have never before experienced, which necessitates a broader and more profound understanding of design for Learning Technology. This needs to be more future-proof than relying on the latest or emerging technologies and yet embraces the multimodal, collaborative and ubiquitous nature of learning in 21 century. In addressing this challenge this symposium will present the approach and principles of Deep Learning Design (DLD) (Ravenscroft & Boyle, 2010). During the first half of the symposium these will be articulated through three research and development initiatives in: a. dialogue-rich learning, b. generative learning design, and c. mobile learning through augmented contexts. These will be the focus of distinctive presentations given by the three authors. These will seed and open up active engagement with the audience in the second half of the session, so that we can collectively take forward our thinking and capture the key issues, challenges and tensions within our community. Note that we will avoid a focus ‘Learning Design (LD)’ based around the IMS-LD standard, although we consider our approach to have some complementarity with learning design more generally (e.g. Lockyear et al., 2009). A main difference however is that DLD is a research driven paradigm for designing contemporary learning that adopts a more humanistic and holistic stance, instead of focussing ostensibly on sharing teaching practice. Hence, it incorporates an emphasis on learners’ and teachers’ active processes and practices within contexts, or is more ‘performative’ and based on the meditating role of learning technology (Saljo, 2010). The paradigm makes use of a combination of Design Based Research (e.g. Design Based Research Collective, 2002) and Action Research methodologies; however, it has the particular focus on designing learning in the Web 2.0 landscape and beyond. The intended outcome for participants are: 1. An understanding of the contemporary challenges for learning technology design, and why this original approach is necessary; 2. An understanding of DLD, and how it contrasts with, or complements, other approaches to design for learning; 3. A framework and practical examples that will allow the adoption and practice of DLD more widely.