Pedagogic paradigms (2 Short Papers 0067, 0130, 0158)


14:50 - 15:30 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room B62

Revision: 0067 deleted from the programme [SS 1/9/2010].

130 Challenging exclusionary practices in digital inclusion projects: a call for redress and "passionate outrage" Jane Seale
158 #tagginganna: creating pedagogic models around searchable tags and reader-commentaries on e-Texts Alex Moseley, Mark Rawlinson, Stuart Johnson
130 Challenging exclusionary practices in digital inclusion projects: a call for redress and "passionate outrage" Jane Seale Digital inclusion is broadly understood as a phenomenon whereby disadvantaged or marginalised learners are able to meaningfully participate in learning, employment social and civic opportunities, through access to digital technologies. Digital divide statistics are complex and reveal that while the gap is reducing for some of the larger disadvantaged groups, most notably older or disabled people, it is not reducing for many of the “smaller groups, most notably travellers, young children, and children in care (Digital Inclusion Team, 2007). Furthermore, the assumption that the digital divide can be reduced simply by providing access to technologies is now not universally accepted. This means that how people choose to engage with technologies and the implications this might have for those who fund, manage and support digital inclusion initiatives is a growing issue. This paper draws on a recent review of digital inclusion research and practice (Seale, 2010) to discuss ways in which educational digital inclusion projects can potentially be exclusionary, and therefore counter-productive. The potential for such exclusion will be illustrated using two examples drawn from different education contexts: adult and community education and gypsy and traveller education: when digital inclusion projects ignore the affective and personal goals of learners; when the provision of technology fails to address deep and structural inequities and prejudices in the education system. Exploration of the first example reveals problems related to fundamental differences between stakeholders (including learners) in what is regarded as a successful outcome of digital inclusion projects. Exploration of the second example reveals problems related to technological determinism and therefore a lack of acknowledgement of the complexity of digital exclusion. This paper will conclude by arguing that we need to address the potentially exclusionary aspects of digital inclusion projects by engaging in research and practice that is underpinned by an inclusion and social justice framework (Freire, 1970; Barton, 2007) that: 1 - seeks to give voice to learners so they are empowered to set their own goals and make choices about why and how they use technology; 2 - challenges discrimination using a stance that stems from ‘passionate outrage’ rather than ’dispassionate interest’.
158 #tagginganna: creating pedagogic models around searchable tags and reader-commentaries on e-Texts Alex Moseley, Mark Rawlinson, Stuart Johnson The College of Arts, Humanities and Law at the University of Leicester ran a 6 month research project on the use of 'text tagging' or markup tools on online texts, exploring the pedagogic opportunities, and technical feasibilities, of the use of such tools for commentary, analysis, reflection and shared meaning across undergraduate (third year English) and postgraduate (distance learning) cohorts. Using a range of tools (including Diigo and Digressit), and working within the Virtual Learning Environment where possible, the project generated a number of interesting pedagogic models (covering modes of study, disciplines and types of media), which will be described as generalisable instances backed up by quantitative and qualitative analysis from the case studies. Affordances included the extension of seminar-quality communal working beyond the classroom time, supporting students' close attention to artifacts (a difficult hurdle in the study of literature), and providing a platform to practice writing in a range of modes (including informal, imitative registers); the project team are now finalising models and drawing final conclusions and these will be reported within the paper. The usefulness of such tagging tools and methods will be discussed from campus-based, blended and distance learning perspectives; and practical advice in the choice and implementation of technologies and pedagogic strategies within different contexts will be provided.