Professional development (2 Proceedings Papers 0025, 0080)


17:15 - 18:15 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room 3a


25 The provision of professional development in ICT: a New Zealand perspective
John Clayton


80 Taking ownership of e-learning: a transferable mentoring model.
Rachel Scudamore, Elaine Arici


25 The provision of professional development in ICT: a New Zealand perspective
John Clayton
During the last fifteen years funding for the provision of professional development in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in New Zealand has increased significantly. This funding acknowledges the competence and confidence of teachers in the educational use of ICT directly impacts upon the capacity and capability of schools to positively engage their learners in ICT-supported learning environments. Initially, the professional development offered followed conventional models of provision. In essence, a perceived need (i.e. teachers’ lack of ICT skills and theoretical knowledge) was centrally addressed. This professional development, where external experts deliver events to address identified deficiencies, is based upon a ‘deficit’ model of professional development. Influenced by the school reforms of the early 1980s a school-focused model, the ICT PD Clusters (ICT PD) model, was introduced in 1996. The ICT PD model encouraged groups of schools to reflect upon teachers’ capabilities and confidence in ICT. The ICT PD shifted investment in professional development from funding a ‘deficit’ approach to an ‘empowerment’ approach (i.e. schools’ decide on the provision, timing and content of professional development offered). This presentation will examine both empowerment and deficit models of professional development within the context of the ICT PD Clusters model. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.


80 Taking ownership of e-learning: a transferable mentoring model.
Rachel Scudamore, Elaine Arici
The School of Education at the University of Nottingham is not alone in having some staff who are active with e-learning and others who are not, or not perceived to be. Why is this so common and what can be done to improve the uptake? The ePioneers project set out to understand staff motivations in relation to e-learning and their own professional development, and to implement a scheme to support staff in contributing to the School's aim of becoming an ‘e-learning school;. An initial investigation identified the main barriers to staff involvement in e-learning, and a strategy to address those barriers focussed on mentoring as a way to draw on the enthusiasms of staff and support them in achieving objectives that they felt were relevant to their own practice. The transferable mentoring model that was developed alongside the project foregrounds the importance of individual ownership of change within a supportive environment. The roles of the mentor as a pedagogic advisor, implementation advisor, motivator and facilitator were identified as important, with individual differences and project needs determining the balance between the roles in any one staff/ mentor relationship. A connection with the wider group of participants was also key to recognising the value of individual efforts to the School. Informal gatherings, local exhibitions, and regular reporting to a project co-ordinator all demonstrated an interest in the project developments beyond the individual academic and their mentor. An online community proved less successful, largely because the sensitive and personal nature of professional development was not suited to written exchange, composed in isolation. The face-to-face conversational opportunities were more welcomed by those involved. Alongside each staff member's specific project outcomes, wider change has been evident. Staff have reported an increase in the confidence to assess e-learning approaches in their teaching development, and are evaluating technology's potential as a normal part of teaching development practice. The school now has a wider group of people involved in e-learning and is able to take ownership of its own e-learning developments. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.