Tablets and feedback (2 Proceedings Papers 0214, 0235)


17:15 - 18:15 on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 in Room 3bc


214 e-Feedback and students’ changing needs and expectations
Yuhua Hu, Paul McLaughlin


235 Can student use of Flip camcorders enhance learning with large cohorts?
Elisabeth Dunne, Laura Taylor, Dale Potter, Jennifer Wren, Karen Leslie


214 e-Feedback and students’ changing needs and expectations
Yuhua Hu, Paul McLaughlin
This study is about the impact of an e-marking practice on first-year undergraduate biology students’ learning experiences and their perceptions, needs and expectations of feedback on written assignments. The presentation will first give a brief description of how the e-marking system works, and it will then focus on the qualitative study conducted with groups of voluntary students who had received e-feedback for a course essay assignment. The findings about the students’ changing perceptions, needs and expectations of feedback will be highlighted. The presentation will finally conclude with some implications of the findings in relation to using computer technologies to enhance the efficiency and quality of feedback on assignments. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.


235 Can student use of Flip camcorders enhance learning with large cohorts?
Elisabeth Dunne, Laura Taylor, Dale Potter, Jennifer Wren, Karen Leslie
The presentation will address the challenge of how students in large, diverse classes can become effectively engaged in their learning through the support of Flip camcorders. It will describe two phases in the implementation of a first year module (Theory of Management) in the University of Exeter Business School wherein a total of 440 students, half of whom are international, have been involved in using Flip camcorders to video their own group presentations, and to watch and learn from the videoed presentations of others. Aspects of the processes of using Flip camcorders, including difficulties with the technology and with the organisation of student recording and uploading, will be highlighted. Methods of data collection and student outcomes and perceptions will be discussed, along with the potential of using a small number of students to take a leadership role in the management of Flip camcorder use. The main benefits – in terms of attendance, group cohesion and quality of work - will be discussed in the context of supporting large international cohorts. Overall, the presentation will allow the audience to be better informed on what works well and on the kinds of problem that might be met in implementing this technology.