Meeting changing student expectations (2 Proceedings Papers 0163, 0177)


15:10 - 16:10 on Wednesday, 8 September 2010 in Room 3bc


163 Placing the student at the heart of the process: using student lifecycle relationship management and service design techniques to enhance the student experience
Sharon Perry, Paul Hollins


177 Software to support student team project working: evaluating a prototype
Janice Whatley


163 Placing the student at the heart of the process: using student lifecycle relationship management and service design techniques to enhance the student experience
Sharon Perry, Paul Hollins
This presentation describes how the small-scale efforts that can be made, improve an institution’s effectiveness in enhancing the student experience. It will demonstrate how techniques, more traditionally associated with customer relationship management in the commercial sector, can be used at various stages of the student lifecycle to meet the changing expectations of the student. Rather than simply explain the benefits of this approach, it will focus on the practical aspects and will provide examples of some of the agile interventions that can be made, based on the research conducted as part of the JISC Relationship Management Programme. As the accompanying paper has been written at the end of this Programme, prior to all the qualitative data being drawn out from it, an update will be given on the success of this approach and of the interventions made. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.


177 Software to support student team project working: evaluating a prototype
Janice Whatley
In higher education team projects are good learning activities for helping to develop team working skills and IT skills, in order to prepare students to be “employable” graduates. Students experience difficulties with team working that sometimes prevents them from gaining the best from the experience. Existing software, such as groupware and virtual learning environments, provide support for the task roles of a team project, but limited support for the maintenance roles. In this presentation the results of a case study evaluation of a software tool to help students with the maintenance roles of team working is provided. The software includes functions for helping to make decisions on allocating tasks to individual team members, and for agreeing ground rules for the team. The particular benefits of this system to the students in the study are presented, together with students’ suggestions for improving the system and for extending the functionality beyond the starting stage of a team project. It is anticipated that this sort of software could be added to existing student support systems, and the presentation will be used as an opportunity to hear delegates’ views on the usefulness of this sort of software. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.