New productivity (2 Proceedings Papers 0200, 0222)


12:00 - 13:00 on Wednesday, 8 September 2010 in Room B62


200 Electronic resource discovery systems: do they help or hinder in searching for academic material
Hanna Stelmaszewska, B.L. William Wong, Balbir S. Barn, Nazlin Bhimani


222 Web-based collaboration in Higher Education:
small steps towards adoption
Tim Neumann, Caroline Bell, David Flanders, Kit Logan, Sarah Sherman, Nick Short, Kim Whittlestone


200 Electronic resource discovery systems: do they help or hinder in searching for academic material
Hanna Stelmaszewska, B.L. William Wong, Balbir S. Barn, Nazlin Bhimani
Higher Education libraries are spending a significant proportion of their learning materials budgets on electronic resources: e-books, full-text databases and back copies of e-journals. However, the use of these resources is relatively low among the undergraduate students; instead students are increasingly using external resources such as Google and YouTube to help them start in their searches. This paper describes the qualitative study of students and researchers in Business and Economic using institutional electronic resource discovery systems (ERDS) when searching for quality academic material. In addition, it discusses which resources are most popular and why as well as the difficulties and challenges the current ERDS present to users. Based on the findings of the study, recommendations for resource discovery systems will be presented in order to improve the use of these resources by higher education students and staff. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.


222 Web-based collaboration in Higher Education:
small steps towards adoption
Tim Neumann, Caroline Bell, David Flanders, Kit Logan, Sarah Sherman, Nick Short, Kim Whittlestone
This paper reports on the early adoption phase of Google Docs as a web-based collaborative tool across six institutions in a concerted effort. The adoption approach was based on a custom framework in order to focus on users and their actual needs, and the adoption was driven by a small project team as opposed to institutional managers. This study therefore reports on suitability and value of the custom framework and on issues of innovation adoption originating from the institutional periphery. Users were reporting a high satisfaction with the tool, and findings show that the use of the tool enhanced collaboration significantly, in turn improving the quality of student learning. The main concern of this paper, though, is the evaluation of the custom adoption framework. This framework is based on the idea of not overwhelming users by introducing small, gradual steps with a technological innovation that is appropriate for their needs. Based on a review of existing adoption models, we attempted to address common issues of individual-based adoption models in our given context. Overall, the framework was successful but needs adaptation. Concepts such as technological gaps do not always align to user perceptions. With some suggested adaptations, though, this framework can be used in similar scenarios. Please see ALT’s Conference Proceedings publication for the full version of this paper.