0117 A student’s experience of producing an effective online intervention with Articulate Presenter for a Master’s dissertation project


13:00 - 14:00 on Wednesday, 8 September 2010 in Pos


0117 A student’s experience of producing an effective online intervention with Articulate Presenter for a Master’s dissertation project
Avril Causer, Heather Wharrad, Richard Windle


0117 A student’s experience of producing an effective online intervention with Articulate Presenter for a Master’s dissertation project
Avril Causer, Heather Wharrad, Richard Windle
Students have a limited time to carry out their dissertation projects particularly in vocational courses like nursing so developing an online intervention as well as testing its effectiveness is often out of the question. However tools such as Articulate Presenter1 allow ‘rapid development’ and for this reason it was used by an undergraduate Master’s student to develop an online package (APP) on ‘Preparing for your paediatric oncology placement’ before testing the effectiveness of the package in a controlled trial with knowledge and self efficacy as outcome measures. The comparison package (CP) had been recommended to the student prior to placement on a paediatric oncology ward. This online resource whilst having some pedagogical attributes such as exercises, was very long, text based and too advanced for an undergraduates, hence the need to develop a resource more aligned to students’ needs. Content development using Articulate Presenter was carried out by the student within a validated methodological framework to ensure quality and accuracy of the final learning package. The RLO-CETL development and evaluation framework was chosen because it has been used for nearly five years and incorporates expert, technical and user review stages (Boyle et al, 2007). As well as guidance on how to use Articulate Presenter, tutorials between the supervisors and student focused on pedagogical design (IMS 2005) including for example the use of appropriate media and self-assessment to facilitate learning. Thirty students were randomly allocated to complete the APP or CP packages. Knowledge and self efficacy questionnaires were completed pre- and post-intervention. A summative evaluation of APP was also completed by the experimental group. Whilst both packages increased knowledge and self efficacy scores, APP increased knowledge scores by a mean of 1.6 ( ±0.8) marks more than CP (p<0.05). Students valued the interactivity and multimedia elements of APP. Rapid elearning tools guided by pedagogical and quality frameworks can be used by dissertation students to produce effective learning resources.